Material

Posts discussion or asking about different boat building materials

newbe ?? on varnishes and bubbles

Submitted by Will_S on Wed, 10/16/2019 - 14:10

While I've built 5 S&G boats, I know very little about how to varnish them; I just blindly did as I was told. That's no longer satisfactory. Lately I've been reading forums, etc, about the subject but I still have a couple unresolved questions. And I think the answers would be of interest to other builders.

Coating for keel protection

Submitted by Mac50L on Sat, 09/07/2019 - 06:20

In the past I've used an epoxy produce, available locally, with carborundum in it. It is a bit like putting on very thick treacle but it does work. To apply, a small container of water and a well wetted finger melding the lumps along the keel. The area to be covered should be masked off and the rest of the hull covered with a plastic sheet. It is  also a good idea to have a sheet on the floor too. All of this to stop leaving a white layer all over everything looking like a bad paint job.

Kayak painting

Submitted by Randy on Mon, 05/06/2019 - 17:00

Because of my glass/epoxy problem in a different thread I decided to paint the lower part of the hull of the Pygmy Tern 14 I just completed. My first paint job, no idea how it will hold up or even if I use an acceptable paint. So, I said to myself, maybe we could have a thread where we discuss the pro's and con's and do's and don'ts of painting. I personally like the looks of hull painted kayaks with varnished decks.

Wood suggestions

Submitted by Gary-IL on Tue, 04/23/2019 - 23:02

Hi. I'm about to start my first kayak. I'm in the Chicago area and I've yet to find any clear (or at least reasonably so) WRC and no place has NWC... at least no store that I've been able to get to. At my local wood shop (Owl for those in the area) I checked out their WRC and it was very knotty. Looked at a bunch of other options and all seemed quite heavy by comparison. The backup choice of basswood wasn't too bad appearance and weight wise but then I found their Spanish Cedar. It is not a wood I had heard of before.

Skin on frame: doubts about the fabric and lashing line

Submitted by Pfolha on Tue, 08/28/2018 - 21:07

Hello everybody,

I'm Brazilian and only found info to build a SOF in English and Spanish, I am facing difficulties in finding the recommended material, sometimes because no one sells locally, other times because I am lost in translation. So I have two questions:

  1. I only found ballistic nylon pre-coated with PVC, PU or Acrylic resin, which one should I choose? 
  2. What is "artificial sinew"? Is it a nylon line?

Thanks in advance, 

Pedro

Kayak Maintenance

Submitted by admin on Tue, 08/28/2018 - 09:14

A couple weeks ago I took time out from other projects to do some quick maintenance on a few a my kayaks. I had a broken back band, worn out gasket and a big ding to deal with. The video is below.

Probably of most interest to people is dealing with the beat up bottom of my Petrel Play SG. This boat has a single layer of glass on the bottom, doubled up only on the keel line. I take this boat to play in rock gardens where the surge sometimes drops me hard on pointy rocks.

Advice seriously needed.

Submitted by Eddie on Thu, 08/02/2018 - 06:47

I'm 77.  Never paddled.  Physically challenged.  Want to build a double sea kayak.  The obvious choice is Stitch & Glue.  And here comes trouble.

I am in Thailand.  Forget about red cedar, CVG, marine grade plywood, Western System Epoxy etc.   I know, for you guys living in US it is a matter of choosing the nearest reliable supplier...  I have honestly tried...  The best thing I can buy here is:

Wood selection for the hull

Submitted by Scott Maschino on Mon, 07/23/2018 - 22:39

I haven't built anything yet, but have been kicking the idea around for several years now. I've done a lot of looking, reading, watching and such. I understand that the "traditional" hull wood is red cedar. I tend to not follow tradition.  I have the opportunity to fell and mill some black walnut and should be able to get some long, straight 8/4 planks. Reading the bark, I have strong hopes that they should yield some long clear grain sections that could be used in a kayak. As well as a few sections that will likely have some curl.